#MountainScience

Melanie Windridge, physicist and guest adventurer for Anturus, set out to western Nepal to summit the mountain Putha Hiunchuli and she documented her journey for Anturus.

Plus, she created five totally free school resources to accompany it!

Supported by…

                                                                                      sponsors

 

 

  • Huw James
  • 20 Jul 2016
Resources

PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT

At high altitude the body doesn’t get enough oxygen so the body cannot function properly. Normal tasks become more difficult.

This experiment aims to provide an insight into the physical impairment felt at high altitude.

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BOILING WATER

At altitude water boils at a lower temperature than at sea level because the lower air pressure means that molecules require less energy to escape the liquid and become a gas. In the lab we have to do things differently.

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ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

Ultraviolet radiation exposure can lead to sunburn, premature skin ageing and skin cancer, as well as causing eye damage (e.g. cataracts), so it’s really important that climbers protect their skin and eyes at altitude.

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Temperature decreases with altitude and mountaineers are often going into cold, snowy environments. Human core temperatures must stay above 35°C or the body changes drastically.

Here we investigate the insulation properties of different materials.

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Here’s an alternative version of the Insulation experiment that you can try if you have access to a Raspberry Pi.

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